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Economy in Brief

Moving Around The United States
by Tom Moeller June 14, 2010

Population growth in the United States has been declining steadily since the early-1990s. Specifically, growth of 1.0% during the last nine years is off from the early-1990s' high of 1.4% and is well below the 1.5%-2.5% growth rates from the mid-1940s to the mid-1960s. Analyzing all of the reasons for the slowdown is beyond the scope of this presentation, yet one thing is clear. The Southern and Western states have seen accelerated growth at the expense of most other sections of the country.

Suffering the greatest decline has been population growth in the country's extreme Northeast. Maine actually experienced net out-migration last year. Chronically slow population growth also characterizes the Northeast and the Midwestern regions with relatively high housing costs and the falloff in factory sector output as a percent of the economy. Michigan also experienced net outmigration during the last four years.

Net-population advances characterizes states in most other regions of the country. During the last five years the strongest growth rates have been in Wyoming, Texas, North Carolina and Colorado. Relatively low housing costs, an aging population as well as an increased ability to communicate electronically has aided population growth in these states. California, however, has seen population growth decelerate sharply with high unemployment and high home-foreclosures.

The data used in the above analysis is available in Haver's USPOP database.

Population Growth (%) 2009 2008 2007 2006
United States 0.9 0.9 1.0 1.0
 
Maine -0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3
New Hampshire 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.8
Vermont 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2
 
New York 0.4 0.2 0.3 0.1
New Jersey 0.5 0.3 0.1 0.0
Massachusetts 0.8 0.7 0.5 0.2
Pennsylvania 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4
 
Louisiana 1.0 1.7 3.2 -5.7
Virginia 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.1
North Carolina 1.5 2.0 2.2 2.3
Georgia 1.4 1.7 2.2 2.6
Florida 0.7 0.8 1.1 1.1
 
Michigan -0.3 -0.5 -0.3 -0.1
Illinois 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.3
Indiana 0.5 0.7 0.7 0.8
Minnesota 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.8
Ohio 0.1 0.1 0.3 0.2
 
Kansas 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.5
Texas 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.5
Arizona 1.5 2.2 2.8 3.6
Colorado 1.8 1.9 1.9 2.0
 
Wyoming 2.1 1.8 2.1 1.3
California 1.0 1.0 0.7 0.5
Washington 1.5 1.6 1.5 1.8
Nevada 1.0 1.9 3.0 3.5
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